Storms dampen new year

Students return to school amid record-setting storms caused by El Nino

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Students returned to school in the middle of a record-setting El Nino Jan. 5. The initial statistics for the 2015-2016 El Nino have matched those of the strongest El Nino on record, according to the National Weather Service.

We have experienced heavy rains in the past and we learned the most important thing we can do is to make sure that water drains away,”

— Kevin Buchanan

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the rainfall peaked in Ventura County Thursday, Jan. 7 with total precipitation ranging from 1.69 inches to 5.34 inches. The El Nino arrived earlier than it has in the past, and is believed to return in early February.

“We have experienced heavy rains in the past and we learned the most important thing we can do is to make sure that water drains away by keeping everyone clear. Blocked drains create backups that could potentially flood classrooms,” Principal Kevin Buchanan wrote in an email.

Students beginning semester-long courses this month had to check out textbooks amid the heavy rain. Both library media technician Shirin Sexton and Buchanan suggest that students use large Ziploc bags to protect their books.

We are concerned about the traffic safety seeing as our students are not very familiar with wet road conditions,”

— Kevin Buchanan

“Honestly, I think there may be a little bit more damage [to textbooks], but I attribute that to students who don’t look at the forecast and don’t know how to take care of their books when it’s raining outside,” Sexton said.

In addition, the administration is concerned about the effects of the rain on student driving.

“We are concerned about the traffic safety seeing as our students are not very familiar with wet road conditions, which require greater stopping distances and more caution,” Buchanan wrote.

Senior Roopa Chandra agrees that the hazardous weather conditions required more caution.

“I had to turn on my car earlier each morning because the weather made it more difficult to see,” Chandra said.

Freshman Sylvia Cruz-Albrecht normally bikes to school, but had to change her daily routine because of the rain.

“For a few days, it was too rainy so I switched to taking the shuttle because the puddles made it dangerous to bike to school. Also [if I biked] I would have to find places to protect my bike from the rain,” Cruz-Albrecht said.

The heavy rain and storms also challenged sports teams that normally practice outside.

 

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